Photos of the website – Credits

 

HUNTER FLIGHT – www.amicidellhunter.ch
Hawker Hunter – www.amicidellhunter.ch
SKYDIVING. www.realfly.ch

 

Source for all photos hereunder: https://images.nasa.gov/#/

NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image of the Great Wall of China in the northern Shanxi Province on January 9, 2001.
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS – A view of the Earth appears over the lunar horizon as the Apollo 11 Command Module comes into view of the Moon before astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin Jr. leave in the Lunar Module, Eagle, to become the first men to walk on the Moon’s surface.
A dying star’s final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star’s demise is still quite lengthy by our standards, lasting tens of thousands of years! The star’s agony has culminated in a wonderful planetary nebula known as NGC 6565, a cloud of gas that was ejected from the star after strong stellar winds pushed the star’s outer layers away into space. Once enough material was ejected, the star’s luminous core was exposed and it began to produce ultraviolet radiation, exciting the surrounding gas to varying degrees and causing it to radiate in an attractive array of colours. These same colours can be seen in the famous and impressive Ring Nebula (heic1310), a prominent example of a nebula like this one. Planetary nebulae are illuminated for around 10 000 years before the central star begins to cool and shrink to become a white dwarf. When this happens, the star’s light drastically diminishes and ceases to excite the surrounding gas, so the nebula fades from view. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures basic image competition by contestant Matej Novak.
AS11-40-5903 (20 July 1969) — Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon near the leg of the Lunar Module (LM) “Eagle” during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) “Eagle” to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Columbia” in lunar orbit.
AS11-40-5902 (20 July 1969) — Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon near a leg of the Lunar Module during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. The astronauts’ bootprints are clearly visible in the foreground. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) “Eagle” to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Columbia” in lunar orbit.
NASA’S HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PRECISELY MEASURED THE MASS OF THE OLDEST KNOWN PLANET IN OUR MILKY WAY GALAXY. ESTIMATED AGE OF 13 BILLION YEARS MORE THAN TWICE AS OLD AS EARTH 4.5 BILLION YEARS.
Mars at Ls 193°: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum
51F-12-034 (29 July-6 Aug 1985) — A ball of liquid floats aboard Challenger as one of the Spacelab 2 crewmembers continues the ongoing fascination of liquids in weightlessness. Coffe, grape juice, orange juice, strawberry punch and various other beverages have been formed into globules, usually by the means of plastic straws, on a number of previous Shuttle missions as well as earlier NASA spacecraft. A second crewmember photographed this closeup with a 35 mm camera.

 

ISS041-E-066943 (7 Oct. 2014) — European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 41 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 13-minute spacewalk, Gerst and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (out of frame), flight engineer, worked outside the space station’s Quest airlock relocating a failed cooling pump to external stowage and installing gear that provides back up power to external robotics equipment.
During its flight, NASA’s Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view.
SS033-E-017942 (1 Nov. 2012) — Expedition 33 Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide takes a picture of his helmet visor while participating in a 6-hour, 38-minute spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Nov. 1, 2012. Various parts of the space station and much of the blue and white Earth below are mirrored in his visor. During the spacewalk, Expedition 33 Commander Sunita Williams, NASA astronaut, and Hoshide, who represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), ventured outside the orbital outpost to perform work and to support ground-based troubleshooting of an ammonia leak.
View of (copyrights CLB):
Les Grandes Jorasses 4208m
Mont Dolent 3820M
Mont Blanc 4810m
Bec des Rosses 3222m
Aiguille D’Argentière 3901m
Aiguille du Chardonnay 3824m
Plateau du Trient 3200m
Aiguille du Tour 3540m